Feversome by Annie Eve (EP)

9 May, 2014 in Music Reviews

Annie Eve

Annie Eve’s ‘Feversome EP’ features three tracks of emotional, country-tinged folk that boast much potential for bigger things to come

Annie Eve-Feversomennie Eve’s Feversome EP is a beautiful landscape of country-tinged, folkish emotion, mixed with sombre, fragile vocals and youthfully poetic lyrics. Counting Bon Iver, Rilo Kiley, Nirvana and Patti Smith among her musical influences, Feversome’s three tracks portray an artist who may just be as emotionally raw as her musical heroes.

Almost every instrument featured on the EP was played by Eve herself, apart from the slide-guitar and accordion. It showcases her talents as a multi-instrumentalist and marks her as an artist with a holistic approach to her songwriting. With all the musical control there’s a real correlation between the music and the feelings it’s trying to project, which is sometimes lost with bands with a similar folk-gaze type feel.

Shuffle starts with layers of folk-infused acoustic flicks. The song slowly builds up with more instrumental layers and introduces the slide guitar, giving the track a more country feel. It works surprisingly well, sounding like a grittier version of Daughter. Southern is a slightly more uptempo track that again explores country-tinged landscapes. Finally, title track Feversome is deeply melancholic. It builds, but retracts to its sombre beginnings and ends on a haunting note.

Eve’s Feversome EP is an accomplished piece of songwriting. The murmuring quality of her voice sometimes leaves it impossible to decipher her lyrics, though they are always sung with conviction. Bands such as Daughter and London Grammar are becoming bigger names within music, and at present her sound is perhaps too comparable to theirs for her to break out. However, what she has that they don’t is the clear ability to make such huge-sounding tracks on her own. With only two EPs behind her, she has a lot of time to prove that she shines in her own right.

Verdict: Accomplished folk-gaze

Tilly Dowman