Way In The World by Nina Nesbitt (EP)

19 July, 2013 in Music Reviews

Nina Nesbitt

On EP #5, Scottish indie-folk songwriter Nina Nesbitt displays a songwriting maturity that suggest success is just around the corner

Nina Nesbitt Way In The Worldhe EP has claimed a special place in the genesis of songwriting skill, becoming the weapon of choice for an artist to enter into listeners’ consciousness. Noted recent examples include Songwriting-acclaimed indie-rockers Speedy Ortiz, the piano-inflected dubstep songwriter James Blake and a chap called Tom Odell. Nina Nesbitt is no exception to this rule.

Only 19 yet, including her debut Live Take release Way In The World is the Scot’s fifth EP. The EPs have shown a distinct development in Nesbitt’s songwriting abilities. Her first three announced her arrival as an artist of precocious songwriting talent, with a voice that could level the Alps to the level surface of Lords. On April’s Stay Out, Nesbitt demonstrated her versatility as a writer, successfully tackling Mumford-esque folk and experimenting with a touch of electronica. On Way Of The World, Nesbitt’s maturity shines through.

“It’s the nod to the Morrissey/Marr songwriting team that resonates most”

Evident from the outset is that Nesbitt has benefited from a greater appreciation of production values, with the EP’s title track opener positively glowing. What’s clear, too, is the new-found influence of The Smiths – think There Is A Light That Never Goes Out. There’s a little of the en vogue Mumford & Sons and Laura Marling thrown in for good measure but it’s the nod to the Morrissey/Marr songwriting team that resonates most strongly and helps to set her apart from the current guitar-slinging songwriting pack. This theme is continued through Brit Summer and Not Me before the excellent piano-augmented closer Spiders.

Nesbitt’s voice has always been recognisable but on Way Of The World her songwriting has a voice more of its own, happily wearing its uniqueness and influences side by side. EP number five is hopefully the prelude to album number one and the platform to success that Nesbitt deserves. That Mr Odell didn’t do too badly from travelling the road from EP to LP, now did he?

Verdict: A mature and assured collection that deserves a wider audience

Damien Girling

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