Count To Three by Cooper Rose (EP)

18 December, 2014 in Music Reviews

Cooper Rose & Will Hyde

Cooper Rose & Will Hyde, a new folk songwriting partnership, bring us ‘Count To Three’

Cooper Rose brings her northern acoustic folk-style confessional vocals and adds an orchestral twist with debut EP ‘Count to Three’

Cooper Rose-Count To Three

ooper Rose is a singer/songwriter from York, who is currently based in Bristol. Her debut EP Count To Three explores a partnership with composer Will Hyde, and together the pair blend instrumental arrangements with gritty, no-nonsense acoustic folk.

Opener Soon instantaneously shows Rose’s drive towards forlorn stories as well as showcasing her original, heavily northern accented vocal. Musically the mixture of understated guitar patterns, subtle piano and string arrangements adds to the melancholy edge of the track. Fans of Sivu, Marika Hackman and Daughter will more than appreciate Cooper Rose.

Run begins as an emotional, confessional acoustic number, wherein an optimistic-sounding brass intro evolves into a full blown orchestral number. It’s cinematic and gives a unique atmosphere and intensity to the track. The different types of music could have potentially contrasted too harshly, but the end result is enjoyable. This track also gives Rose a chance to display her vocal capacity.

“I only want to be adored,” Rose croons with the utmost vulnerability in Adored. Musically, the fragile nature of the lyrics is well reflected, from the acoustic guitar rhythms alongside melodic piano that compliment each other fantastically, to the country-style electric guitars and subtle string arrangements. Clearly lot of thought has gone into the arrangements in the piece, which draws out the tone of the track in an extremely successful way.

It’s clear from Count To Three that Cooper Rose and Will Hyde have a unique songwriting relationship that bodes for a intriguing blend of cinematic orchestral pieces alongside a deep rooted alt-folk style. A quality effort for a debut EP.

Verdict: A more than solid addition to the new wave of folk

Tilly Dowman

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